There’s concern among some lawmakers about the possible overturning of Roe v. Wade since the controversial leak of a Supreme Court draft opinion on the issue.

If it does end up being overturned, that would immediately have an impact on Michigan, where due to a state law last updated in 1931 most abortions, including cases of incest and rape, would be seen as a felony.

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The penalty is up to four years, but Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel says she won’t enforce that law if it goes back into effect.

Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald says she agrees that the old law doesn’t apply well to the situation.

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“We always have to assume the worst-case scenario,” said McDonald. “So I’m going to do what I was elected to do and that is use my discretion and common sense to protect the people in Oakland County. We have 1.3 million people and it’s just not practical. We have limited resources. Both in our county and everywhere. We have an all-time high in gun violence. My county just experienced the first ever mass school shooting. The idea that we could spend resources prosecuting doctors or nurses or a front desk staff at a clinic is not rational and doesn’t keep us safe. And it also won’t eliminate abortions, it will just make abortions less safe.”

The Supreme Court is meeting Thursday for the first time since the controversial leak.

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