Southfield (CW50) – On January 1st, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation took effect. The proclamation stated that all enslaved people in states that were currently engaged in rebellion against the Union “shall be then, henceforward, and forever free.”

 

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However, the news was slow to travel across the country, reaching certain states months, even years, after the document was signed.

On June 19th, 1865, General Order No. 3 was announced by the Union Army, proclaiming that all slaves in the state of Texas were free. This day became well-known as the day in which the news reached the most remote slave state in the country. Celebrations of June 19th would continue annually starting in 1866 in Texas.

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Community Connect Host Jackie Paige, with Ken Coleman, Senior Reporter for Michigan Advance

Ken Coleman, Senior Reporter for Michigan Advance, joins Jackie Paige on Community Connect to go into detail about the history behind Juneteenth and how it was been celebrated through the decades.

Coleman shares his own stories of learning about Juneteenth and the significance Detroit has in Black history.

A bill to recognize Juneteenth as a Federal Holiday has been passed unanimously in the Senate and signed into law by President Joe Biden on Thursday, June 17th.

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