(CBS DETROIT) – Michigan is one step closer to reaching the goal of vaccinating 70 percent of the state.

All residents 16 and up are now eligible to get the covid vaccine.

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Gov. Gretchen Whitmer joined seven teens Tuesday at Ford Field in Detroit to get vaccinated.

“Today, I am really grateful to be receiving my first dose of one of the three safe, effective vaccines,” said Whitmer.

Joined by her 19-year-old daughter, Governor Whitmer received the Pfizer vaccine which is recommended for people 16 and up, while Moderna and Johnson and Johnson is reserved for adults 18 and older.

The shots were administered by Michigan’s Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun and Dr. Betty Chu, the chief quality officer at Henry Ford Health System.

“Today I’m here more as a mom than I am as a doctor. I mean it’s just really an emotional thing I think for everybody. When you get you vaccine but also you need to make sure that your kids are protected. Especially, in light of everything that’s happening right now with the cases rising,” said Chu.

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Dr. Chu’s son Aidin Shoresh also received a vaccine and is one of the teens volunteering on the “Protect Michigan Commission” as a COVID-19 ambassador.

“I think it’s important for me to help gain immunity, gain some protection in the community and so I personally can interact with others in a safer manner,” said Shoresh.

And as vaccines roll out, state health regulators are ringing the alarm on COVID cases in Michigan.

The latest report shows 5,000 new cases per day, leaving experts pushing for more people to get the shot.

“We’ve now got vaccines that are over 95% effective and even if you do get covid-19 once you’ve had the vaccine it’s highly unlikely that you will be hospitalized or die,” said Khaldun.

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