Southfield (CW50) – Each year, we celebrate Women’s History Month in March, honoring the women in history who made an impact on our country and the world. But we don’t just celebrate the well-known names from the history books, the women who made every day impacts in their communities and families are celebrated as well.

The Detroit Historical Society celebrates these women through exhibits, detailing the lives of each woman. This year, DHS is highlighting the women of the 1920s and explores the changes Detroit underwent during the decade. The city’s drastic contradictions during the era, from the rich and glamorous parts of the city to the derelict and impoverished areas are also examined in the exhibit. The new exhibit, “Boom Town,” tells the decade’s stories through 20 personal histories of real residents of the era, representing different ages, backgrounds and occupations, while evoking storied locations around the city. 

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Some of the women highlighted in the exhibit include: Julia Brunell, a 15-year-old rum runner who made pickups for her parents’ speakeasy, Lillian Johnson, an African American Suffragette, and Jessie Bonstelle, an actress and theater director who founded the Bonstelle Theater.

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Community Connect Host April Moss, with Rebecca Salminen Witt, Chief Communications and Development Officer of the Detroit Historical Society

In this exclusive CW50 Web Extra, April Moss sits down with Rebecca Salminen Witt, Chief Communications and Development Officer of the Detroit Historical Society, to discuss the lives of these women and what people can expect from this year’s exhibit.

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To read more about Boom Town: Detroit in the 1920s, go to DetroitHistorical.org